Friday, 22 June 2012

Windows 8 JavaScript Metro Application–Getting Started

Couple of mounths ago I wrote about My First Windows 8 Application – Metro Puzzle when using Windows 8 Developer Preview, since than things has changed.

Windows 8 JavaScript Metro Application–Getting Started


In this article I'll show the new Windows 8 JavaScript development process and couple of features for Metro apps.
•Getting Started
•Settings
•MessageBox
•Splash
•Asynchronous Programming & App Storage

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Using Bing Maps For Windows 8 Metro Apps - C# / JavaScript

Bing Maps SDK is available for Visual Studio 2012 RC and Windows 8 release preview, Bing Maps SDK is easy fast and cool control that you can use in your Metro App.

Bing Maps SDK for Metro style apps (Release Preview) combines the power of Windows 8 and Bing Maps™ to provide an enhanced mapping experience for Metro style apps. This SDK includes controls for apps built using JavaScript, as well as apps built using C#, C++, and Visual Basic.

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Thursday, 21 June 2012

Shocker: Windows 8 is an Android killer

Shocker: Windows 8 is an Android killer

Developer Daniel Sharp says that working with Windows 8 is simple and enjoyable, unlike the often unpredictable Android.

I’ve just come from another testing meeting. Seven of us around a table looking at an Android app that’s in the mid-stages of development. We’ve found unique issues on each device, every device on the table was running a different version of Android, with different resolutions, capabilities and specifications. Getting this right is going to be time consuming…
 
Meanwhile, for the past seven weeks we’ve also been working on a super-secret project building magazine apps for the Windows 8 launch. In those seven weeks, we’ve managed to create a solid first version, that works across all resolutions, laptops, desktops and tablets, whether they use a touch screen, pen or mouse. Development was easy.

Read full article here

What’s new for Developers in Windows 8 Release Preview

What’s new for Developers in Windows 8 Release Preview

Upgrading from Windows 8 Consoler Preview to Release Preview introduces changes to Metro development, namespaces, styles names, project structures, and so much more.
If you are a developer and you are wondering what the delta really is for developers, you are in luck. The Windows team has written such a document (Migrating your Windows 8 Consumer Preview app to Windows 8 Release Preview) and it goes into incredible detail for you.

This paper provides guidance and tips for migrating code assets built using the Windows 8 Consumer Preview released in February 2012 to the Windows 8 Release Preview. It includes porting guidance, a change manifest, and helpful details for developers who are tasked with migrating apps from the Windows 8 Consumer Preview. It assumes that the reader is familiar with the Windows 8 Consumer Preview.

Download full article from Microsoft

Windows 8: 15 More Reasons why I choose XAML over HTML5

Windows 8: 15 More Reasons why I choose XAML over HTML5


Metro developers building applications for Windows 8 have choices to make. A few weeks ago, I put together my top ten reasons to choose XAML. That really got me thinking. There are so many more than 10 good reasons why I prefer XAML. I thought I would continue the list.

First, let’s reflect on the first list:


  1. It’s a nail – I am a hammer
  2. Bind to anything
  3. Resolution independency
  4. Dependency properties
  5. Platform adoption
  1. OOP
  2. State
  3. Expression blend
  4. Debugging
  5. Vectors, vectors, vectors
Read full article here

MEF for Windows 8 Metro and TPL Data Flow Moved to NuGet

Microsoft has decided to remove MEF for Windows 8 Metro and TPL Data Flow from the .NET 4.5 framework release. Instead they will be offered as NuGet packages so that improvements can be released outside of the full .NET release cycle.

This decision continues an overall trend within Microsoft’s Developer Division to move away from large development cycles. A good example of this is ASP.NET MVC. Since 2009 it has had three major releases and is on the verge of a fourth. By comparison ASP.NET WebForms has only had one release. Though the next version of WebForms contains numerous enhancements that should have been released at the same time MVC got them, Microsoft is waiting until all of Visual Studio 2012 and .NET 4.5 is ready.

A more complicated example is Entity Framework. The core of the product is still tied to .NET’s release cycle. However, many of the important features such as “Code First” are being released out-of-band via NuGet.

Read full article here

The Cost of Microsoft’s Surface Tablet

The Cost of Microsoft’s Surface Tablet
Let’s just assume for a few minutes that Microsoft’s Surface tablet is as delicious as Microsoft executives made it out to be on Monday night.

Does Microsoft then have any hope of competing with the iPad on price?

Apple, for many years, had a reputation for charging a premium for its products, but the aggressiveness of its iPad pricing was a surprise to many people. In October, when I “looked at changing perceptions of Apple’s pricing, the cheapest iPad (its second-generation model) started at $499. Now that same product starts at $399, while the third-generation iPad with a high-resolution retina display starts at $499.

Read full article here

What Windows 8 Haters Don’t Understand About Windows 8

What Windows 8 Haters Don’t Understand About Windows 8
Lately, I notice a strong debate about Windows 8. People tend to either hate it or love it. There are no moderate verdicts being shared. Those who hate it share mostly the same complaints, many of which I think are wrong. That’s why I decided to share my view on those arguments and what I believe is the main thing people don’t understand about Windows 8.

Read full article here

Wednesday, 20 June 2012

Working with IAsync* WinRT Methods

Working with IAsync* WinRT Methods

Metro style applications built on the Windows Runtime are especially sensitive to any delays in the UI thread. Users will immediately notice when the UI trails their touch input and “doesn’t stick to their finger.” Animations that stutter and skip are immediately visible. Any lag in processing negatively affects the experience and the perception of not only your application, but the platform as a whole. A good way to help ensure your application doesn’t get into this state is to make long-running calls asynchronous. In this article, based on chapter 3 of Windows 8 XAML in Action, author Pete Brown discusses the Windows Runtime approach to asynchronous code.

The Windows Runtime was built with the concept of asynchronous operations. It was also built with the idea that these asynchronous operations must work not only for C#, but also for JavaScript, C++, and any number of other, very different languages. For those reasons, the team didn’t take a dependency on the Task Parallel Library in .NET, but, instead, created an interface-based approach consistent with the rest of the Windows Runtime.

The Windows.Foundation namespace contains the types and interfaces required to support asynchronous functions in WinRT. Every asynchronous operation implements, at a minimum, the IAsyncInfo interface. Like most programming problems, there is an easy but limited way to do async and a more complex but capable way.

In this article, we’ll look at the different approaches for using the WinRT asynchronous APIs; that is, the ones which return IAsync* interfaces. I’ll cover the easiest approach and then look into what’s needed to check progress or cancel an asynchronous operation.

Read full article here

Syncfusion Metro Studio (Metro style icon templates )

Syncfusion Metro Studio (Metro style icon templates )

Syncfusion Metro Studio is a collection of over 600 FREE Metro-style icon templates that can be easily customized to create thousands of unique Metro icons using an intuitive customization tool. Metro Studio is the only icon collection that you will ever need for building Metro-style applications. The icons are available royalty free and can be used in commercial applications.

Read full article here

WinRT vs. Silverlight - Part 0

I recently wrote a blog post series on how to share your code between Silverlight and WPF.

With the announcements of Windows 8 at the //BUILD/ conference and the new Windows Runtime (WinRT) which can be built against using C# and XAML I thought it appropriate to start a new series on how to make your existing Silverlight/WPF code run on WinRT. I'm mostly writing this as notes to myself and hope you will also find them useful. Personally I've already found a lot of issues with porting code over. Not that there are significant changes, but the documentation is very limited at this point, and the gotchas enough to make you waste a lot of time on resolving this. Hopefully this will act as a resource to get it working for you as well. Keep an eye on this post. I'll post new links as I go along learning new things about WinRT.

Generally what I have found is that with respect to XAML WinRT is more compatible to Silverlight than WPF, so expect it easier to use your Silverlight knowledge, and don't try and use WPF XAML features at this point. Things like DataTriggers etc. are not supported, and for the most part, the UI related methods in code are more similar to Silverlight than .NET 4 (note however that non-UI code is closer to the "original" .NET, since this is essentially the same CLR and compiler used).

Read full article here

Porting Silverlight or WPF XAML/code to a Metro style app

If you're familiar with other XAML-based platforms such as Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF), Microsoft Silverlight or Silverlight for Windows Phone, then you can re-use these skills to create Metro style apps for Windows 8 Release Preview. This topic lists high-level differences you should be aware of between programming on these different platforms.

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How to Get a Developer License for Windows 8 App Development

How to Get a Developer License for Windows 8 App Development


If you have installed Windows 8 Release Preview and Visual Studio 2012 RC, you might want to develop your first Windows 8 Metro Style Application. Unlike other version of Visual Studio, you need a Developer License to build your Win8 Metro apps. Without a developer license you won’t be able to deploy the app in your Windows 8 machine or Windows 8 simulator.

This blog post will help you to understand it better and will guide you to get a Free Developer License for Windows 8 Metro application development. Continue reading to get your developer license.
Read full article here

Developing Apps for Microsoft Surface, Windows 8, Windows RT and Windows Phone

Microsoft just raised the bar in the tablet market. Unless you’ve been living under a rock for the past 24 hours, you know that Microsoft finally revealed their own tablet device, dubbed “Microsoft Surface”, built independently from its traditional OEMs. This new Microsoft Surface comes in two flavors, running either Windows 8 Pro or Windows RT. You can find all the known details on the new Microsoft Surface site here.

The Microsoft Surface devices are very new and there are still some hardware features we do not know about yet, but the operating systems powering Microsoft Surface are not new. The details about Windows 8 and Windows RT have been known for months, dating as far back as the Microsoft //Build conference last year in September 2011.


Read full article here

Tuesday, 19 June 2012

Missed the Microsoft Surface keynote? Watch the entire video out here

Microsoft Surface keynote spoken by Steve Ballmer


Microsoft recently announced their Surface tablet and it’s already got the entire tech world talking about it. Missed the live keynote? Here's the entire unedited version of the keynote for your viewing pleasure..........

Click here to read full article
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